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Canada: A Botched Mosaic (part 4)

Editor’s note: This story about Canadian multiculturalism was originally a single 3,600 word article meant for a British magazine. I decided to turn it into a mini-series. It tells the story of Peter, a Lebanese-Canadian youth and his experience of Canadian multiculturalism. He meets different people through his life who influence his thoughts. Although this tale contains many true elements and anecdotes, it is a work of fiction. Read part 1 here, 2 here, and part 3 here

When I was still in CEGEP[1], some eight years ago, I used to work in a call centre. Those who worked

Papa Wemba
Papa Wemba is an example of an African (Congolese) singer who found success in France. He is idolized by Africans for doing so. Photo by Radio Okapi

there were either students who needed a part-time job, recent immigrants whose experience in their home country was deemed inadequate just because it wasn’t Canadian experience, and strange characters you wished you’d never known. Most of the time, I sat with a group of Brazilians, a Senegalese youth named Didier, and a Pakistani Muslim woman named Saeeda. There were very few French-Canadians and Anglo-Canadians. One of the supervisors, a male French-Canadian student, once walked into the office and said after having looked at all the employees “Holy Shit! I’m the only white person in this room!” Because of my

Read moreCanada: A Botched Mosaic (part 4)

My (Short) Twitter Conversation with Fit Finlay and Masakatsu Funaki

I’m a sucker for all things martial arts and pro wrestling. When I heard that one of my favourite wrestlers, David “Fit” Finlay was a shooter, I began searching the internet for matches in which I could see his catch wrestling wizardry and knowledge of the martial arts. One day, I came across a YouTube video in a language I never heard before (Welsh?) in which Finlay wrestled Masaharu Funaki in a promotion called Reslo. Could it be? Could this Masaharu Funaki who looked, dressed and wrestled like Masakatsu Funaki be THE Masakatsu Funaki? I had to find out.

Read moreMy (Short) Twitter Conversation with Fit Finlay and Masakatsu Funaki

ISIS and Anger Marketing

Anger: it’s one of the most powerful emotional triggers. Marketers know it and so do ISIS’s recruiters. Anger is truly powerful: it makes people act without thought, buy without thought, accept without thought. That is exactly what ISIS needs to get people to join their ranks.

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Canada: a Botched Mosaic (part 3)

Editor’s note: This story about Canadian multiculturalism was originally a single 3,600 word article meant for a British magazine. I decided to turn it into a mini-series. It tells the story of Peter, a Lebanese-Canadian youth and his experience of Canadian multiculturalism. He meets different people through his life who influence his thoughts. Although this tale contains many true elements and anecdotes, it is a work of fiction. Read part 1 here and 2 here.

I remember a conversation I once had with three good friends of mine at one of their apartments some two years ago. We were debating politics.

“Quebec should separate!” said Jean-Philippe.

Racists everywhere

“Canada is just a bunch of provinces spliced together.” said Sarah.

Read moreCanada: a Botched Mosaic (part 3)

The Liquor Store Serves the Montreal Jazz Festival Well

A few weeks ago, I was at La marche d’à côté to see Montreal Blues-Rock guitarist Justin Saladino. I was intrigued by the precision of his rhythm guitarist. His name was Felix Blackburn.

“Yes, I do play in another band, a jazz band,” said Felix. “It’s called The Liquor Store. We’ll be playing at the Montreal Jazz Festival. Come check us out.” I come to their second show at the festival and I am not disappointed.

Read moreThe Liquor Store Serves the Montreal Jazz Festival Well

Mastery and Elegance

Note: This article was originally published on the Trio Fibonacci’s blog. You may view the original article here.

We chose a theme that relates to current events: migrants.” That is how Julie-Anne Derome began the “Artistes Migrateurs” concert on March 4th at Bourgie Hall at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. The Trio Fibonacci violinist explained that the pieces she would present that night were written by composers who had to leave their home country.

Read moreMastery and Elegance

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